abandoned Frets have been standing in Germany for many years

In the small town of Aurich in northwestern Germany, there is a peculiar attraction – the abandoned Lada car dealership. If someone drives by and wants to look into this place, then here is their address: Fockenbollwerkstr. 39, 26603 Aurich.

In the courtyard of the Zetor-service company (a Czech manufacturer of tractors), closed 20 years ago, which traded Czech agricultural machinery in addition to AvtoVAZ products, several export “nines” that were not sold yet found their last shelter (only three cars are visible in the courtyard, but local claim that there are at least a dozen of them).

Abandoned Frets in Germany

It’s still surprising that the cars are still intact. We would have taken them away for spare parts and scrap metal long ago, but here, please, they are standing. Unless they were covered with perennial dirt and lichen, and after certain restoration manipulations they could have become excellent museum exhibits – after all, 100% original, straight from the salon, with zero mileage. Real time capsules!

Here is a red Lada Topas with lost side mirrors. In this configuration, the “nine” sports a proprietary body kit and stickers, a sunroof, Melber KBA rims, and the Austrian Foha Ratipur spoiler. It features a leather-braided Italian three-spoke Raid steering wheel and an electronic clock.

Abandoned Frets in Germany

But the product of joint “creativity” of Boris Berezovsky’s company AVVA, AvtoVAZ and the Finnish company Valmet Automotive – Lada Samara Baltic blue. Such a car with original bumpers and interior was produced in Finland from 1996 to 1998.

In the photo the car is equipped with GL. Under the hood, an injection engine 1.5 and, oh my! – Volkswagen steering wheel with airbag! The domestic consumer of the late 90s did not get such Lada. The export products of AvtoVAZ were often “finished” by local dealers.

To lure a sophisticated European consumer in an environment of great competition, the “Spartan” configurations of the standard “eights” and “nines” were clearly not enough. Hence all sorts of “Topas”, “Baltikas”, convertibles “Natasha” and others appeared.

True, despite all these efforts, Lada never became hits abroad (not counting Niva). Although the export cars were made of much better quality than domestic ones, and they were relatively inexpensive by European standards, they were “too tough” to beat the same Volkswagen Golf in terms of their consumer characteristics.

Abandoned Frets in Germany

Abandoned Frets in Germany

Abandoned Frets in Germany

Abandoned Frets in Germany

This is how “live” Lada Topas and Baltic look like

Pepper Topaz

Pepper Topaz

Lada Baltic

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